Fire rips through factory in capital

Pech Sotheary / Khmer Times No Comments Share:
Onlookers watch the factory blaze from a distance. Koh Santepheap

A fire broke out at the Meikodo Cambodia factory in Phnom Penh yesterday, destroying more than 50 percent of materials on the factory floor, officials said.

Yim Saran, Por Senchey district police chief, said yesterday that the fire occurred at about 2pm and that firefighters were only able to put out the blaze by 5pm.

The fire destroyed factory materials, but did not cause any injuries, he noted.

. .

“We still do not yet know the extent of the damages, as we are waiting for an assessment by the factory owners first,” Mr Saran said. “As for the cause of the fire, we are waiting for forensics to examine the factory.”

Prom Yorn, director of Phnom Penh Municipal Fire Department, said yesterday that it took 41 firetrucks and about 236 cubic metres of water to extinguish the fire.

“The fire broke out in the colour mixing room, around the production chain,” Mr Yorn said, adding that the damage was quite extensive. “The initial damage measured was at about 50 percent of factory materials.”

Two firetrucks at the scene of the blaze. Koh Santepheap

Meikodo Cambodia representatives could not be reached for comment yesterday. Factory security guard Ek Kin said that he was unaware of the cause of the fire.

Mr Kin noted that he only saw workers fleeing in shock while others were saying that a fire had broken out.

. .

“There are about 100 workers employed at this particular factory,” he said. “I have no idea why a fire broke out in the first place.”

However, local media reported that a group of workers said the fire was caused by a needle producing machine overheating, causing an electrical fire.

Mr Yorn said that as of this year, 48 fires have occurred in Phnom Penh, causing one death and 12 injuries. In 2017, there were 514 fires that killed 22 and injured 12 people across the Kingdom.

Share and Like this post

Related Posts

Previous Article

King plants national conservation idea

Next Article

Two hurt after fire engulfs taxi