Svay Rieng to see new water plant

Chea Vannak / Khmer Times No Comments Share:
Xinhua/Song Weiwei

In a bid to expand access to clean water across the country, the Ministry of Industry and Handicrafts is urging Angkor Potable Water Co Ltd to speed up work on a feasibility study for a water treatment plant in Svay Rieng province.

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In a meeting on Friday, Cham Prasidh, Minister of Industry and Handicrafts, asked representatives of Angkor Potable Water to accelerate work on the feasibility study, explaining that the project is key for the province.

The company plans to build a treatment plant, connect households to the water supply, and directly charge users, according to the Ministry of Industry and Handicrafts.

The project will benefit two districts – Chantrea and Bavet city – which Minister Prasidh said are of great economic importance to the province.

The project is considered of key importance due to its location in a special economic zone, and is in line with the government’s goal to give access to clean water to all Cambodian households by 2025, said Um Sotha, secretary of state at the Ministry of Industry and Handicrafts.

“The ministry allowed the feasibility study to take place because it seeks to increase access to clean water in these areas,” he said, explaining that, “At the moment, the state-run Svay Rieng Water Supply Authority is only present in the province’s capital city.”

Mr Sotha did not reveal further details on the project, such as total investment planned or the plant’s capacity. He did say, however, that the company will not be allowed to sell its treated water at a higher price than that charged by Svay Rieng Water Supply Authority.

“We want the price of clean water produced at the upcoming plant to be similar to what Svay Rieng Water Supply Authority charges its users,” he said.

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