FOOD on the move

Hiezle Bual / Khmer Times No Comments Share:
The rule of thumb to remember while digging into Cambodian itinerant food is safely: if it’s not well-cooked or if you didn’t peel it yourself, then avoid, otherwise eat up! KT/Jean-Francois Perigois

Others call it food carts or mobile food stores or just itinerant food sellers.

As you drive or walk the streets of Cambodia, regardless of how you call it, you’ll be tempted to try some of the appetizing roadside moving food vendors with lots and lots of options to choose from.

The convenience it gives to the buyers is priceless.

Imagine an afternoon at home, chilling and suddenly, you crave for fried bananas or chips or hotdog on sticks then food carts pass along the street adjacent to where you are. Voila! Cravings satisfied.

But more than light snacks and food cravings, you can also find mobile food stores selling vegetables, eggs and even seashells baked under the sun. Careful on the seashells though, unless you’ve got an ironclad stomach that mostly don’t, these typical Cambodian street foods should be given a pass.

However, almost every food looks good and most people, especially locals, will agree that its taste is just as good. But for eaters who are sensitive, your taste buds might agree with the local taste, but your stomach might disagree with the local bugs.

The rule of thumb to remember while digging into Cambodian itinerant food is safely: if it’s not well-cooked or if you didn’t peel it yourself, then avoid, otherwise eat up!

In whatever condition, may it be common or exotic, you don’t see the same carts at the same spot all the time. So, if you’re in need of something to fill in your stomach, go for them while you can.

* Note: In last week’s In Focus ‘Every piece of jewelry tells a story’, published on August 24, 2018, we need to point out that the jewelers featured in the section are in no way related to Madeline Green’s jewelry business. We apologise for the misunderstanding.

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