NEC sets seal on CPP poll wins

Khuon Narim / Khmer Times No Comments Share:
Prime Minister Hun Sen casts his vote.

The National Election Committee’s final commune poll results have shown the ruling CPP took 6,503 seats while the opposition CNRP won 5,007 of 11,572 seats in 1,646 communes nationwide.
 
This equates to 56 percent of seats for the CPP and 43 percent for the CNRP, with the remainder split among the smaller parties. 
 
Seven of the 12 political parties contesting the polls received seats as either commune chiefs or councillors.
 
The CPP won 1,156 commune chief positions, 1,139 first deputies and 510 second deputies.
 
The CNRP received 489 commune chief positions, 503 first deputies and 1,087 second deputies. 
 
The Khmer National United Party won 24 seats, including one commune chief position and two first deputy commune chiefs and 16 second deputies. 
 
Funcipec took 28 seats, including one first deputy commune chief position and 26 second deputy posts. 
 
The Grassroots Democracy Party got five seats, which were a mix of first and second deputy commune chief. 
 
The League for Democracy Party received four seats – all second deputy commune chiefs – while the Beehive Social Democracy Party received one seat, also as a second deputy.
 
CPP spokesman Sok Eysan said he respected the NEC’s results. 
 
He added he was not disappointed the CPP had lost some of its commune seats compared with the last election in 2012, when the party had 1,592 commune chiefs.
 
“It is normal because our country is promoting democratic pluralism,” Mr Eysan said.  
 
CNRP spokesman Yim Sovann praised the NEC for fulfilling its obligations better than in the past. 
 
However, he said the political atmosphere was still not free and fair, since voter intimidation continued. 
 
“About one million migrants working abroad did not register to vote,” he added.
 
“The NEC has to work on some issues such as preparing to help those workers register in 2018. In addition, about 70,000 people can’t vote because they lack the necessary documents.”
 
According to a statement from the election monitoring situation room, restrictions on political freedom and limits to fairness remain, but election management has improved overall.
 
It said the election process has been significantly improved and made more transparent that before, in terms of voter registration and voter list management, candidate registration, polling and counting processes, and the announcement of electoral results.
 
However, significant irregularities or issues occurred prior to the election, which established a context that negatively impacted the fairness of the vote, it added.
 
There was “an environment of political suppression, a lack of transparency and inequities in campaign finance, the misuse of state resources, and an unequal playing field” as well as “intimidation of civil society by officials from security services that undermine liberal democratic pluralism”.

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